TEDx Manitoba Participants

The following is an *unofficial* list of TEDx Manitoba participants and their online coordinates. These are the people who — someplace on Twitter — have references that at least imply they’ll be there. The list was built from my TEDxMB Twitter List, so the “@” links and “#” hashtags below are Twitter links. The Bio’s are mostly from Twitter as well. I have only included the speakers for whom I have social media particulars rather than just websites, since (a) the official TEDx Manitoba site already has that info and more, and (b) my intent was more toward connecting/following through social media.

The Art of Non-Conformity: A Quick Review

Chris Guillebeau’s first book, The Art of Non-Conformity, is not a business book, at least not per se. It’s more of a manifesto for living differently, in which Guillebeau makes a passionate appeal for people not to accept the role of living out a life of what’s expected, but to chart your own unconventional course instead.

Thinking Differently about the Virtual/Natural World Intersection (TED Talk by Pranav Mistry)

As good as most of them are it’s a rare TED video that makes you want to stand and applaud with the crowd even though you’re only streaming a recording of a past event. But this TED Talk by Pranav Mistry has some truly jaw-dropping stuff, particularly for those who haven’t much considered the extent to which we could be interfacing our digital world our the natural one. Some of this looks like genuine science fiction. Haven’t heard of him? I hadn’t either. “Pranav Mistry is a PhD student in the Fluid Interfaces Group at MIT’s Media Lab. Before his studies at MIT, he worked with Microsoft as a UX researcher; he’s a graduate of IIT. Mistry is passionate about integrating the digital informational experience with our real-world interactions.” He is also the inventor of SixthSense.

The Benefit of Failure

J.K. Rowling at Harvard Commencement Via TED’s Best of the Web Talks, I discovered J.K. Rowling‘s Harvard Commencement Address in June 2008 on The Fringe Benefits of Failure, and the Importance of Imagination. The subject brings up an important concept — the fact that although we list only successes on our CVs, it is typically the failures that teach us more. Comparatively, success perhaps teaches us very little. When was the last time you judged someone as qualified because of the lessons learned in their last failure? Granted, this might not be the single best criteria, but someone who’s never failed may well be an underachiever stuck within the constraints of mediocre thinking.

J.K. Rowling:

To See What You're Missing

card2207 A recent Jessica Hagy Diagram caught my interest (do the ol’ click-to-enlarge thing), reminding me of things I’ve said before about thinking differently and challenging assumptions. It’s an important process and one I fancy as a kind of specialty of mine. In approaching any challenge, I’m continually trying to see it from a different angle in order to get the necessary perspective to see the solution, whether it’s conventional or not. Along these lines, the other day Seth Godin wrote about the scientific method,

If you enter a conversation looking for something to test, measure and ultimately change, it's likely you'll find it. That change makes you more competitive, and you continue to cycle past your competitors. On the other hand, if you enter a conversation concerned about maintaining the status quo, it's likely that this is exactly what you're going to do.