TEDxManitoba 2012 Technical Report

I’ve been quite busy over the past few weeks wrangling all the technical aspects of TEDxManitoba 2012, which took place this past February 9th. Being a part of the steering committee for the event was an incredible experience, as was working with my crew in my position as technical lead. I was also fortunate to make a number of new connections and friends through the experience — as well as, of course, hearing some fantastic ideas worth spreading. After the event went so well, I wanted to write up a quick overview of how we pulled off the day’s technical aspects so I could give credit where credit is due. (Lost? Read up on TEDx Events.)

My Business Card is No Longer Crap

Following my recent business card post, the redesign and printing of my new cards is now complete. Here’s what they look like, front and back:
card_front card_back
Click to enlarge, etc. The thing to know — which explains the front of the card — is that they’re not printed on standard-sized business card stock, but on 150-lb tag, cut to 3″x5″. Index card size. The dotted line is actually a perforation, so a standard-sized business card can be detached from the index card. When I flip the card over, it’s designed to write on the back, either horizontally or vertically. Detaching the standard-sized business card leaves the knight logo aligned in the corner on the back. For good measure (and attention to detail), the heavier lines on the grid are exactly ½”.

Coup d'Oeil: Now With 50% More Pith!

I’ve more-pith300x300 decided to start doing more posts around here, but make them less “complete.” Or less wordy. With any luck, this should be a win-win… I’ll do more updates, but they’ll be a lot shorter. More pith, because I actually like to be pithy — or at least make the attempt. 50% more pith, even.[1. Hence the slogan; the fine print reads, “Avoid eye contact. Regular reading of the material on this blog may cause excessive snarkiness and occasional pith. If swallowed, consult a physician immediately.” click the image for a closer look.] More pith, but without losing any snarkiness. This means that when I write articles that are more “feature-length” as many of my past posts have been, I’ll set them apart as articles or featured content rather than standard blog updates.

In Case You Were Wondering

I am still updating this blog, though not on a regular schedule… for this reason, I recommend following the RSS feed so you don’t miss any of the new articles. At the same time, I’ve been getting Penguinista.org back up and running, so most of my tech items will now appear over there instead. Head over there and poke around, subscribe to the feed, and watch for the Geek news over there. It’s still getting warmed up, and I am inviting contributors on that site that have an interest in Linux, Open Source Software, Internet culture. A side-effect of the move will allow this blog to remain more business/marketing focused. For the benefit of those who prefer not to have shorter items in their feed readers, I have moved my business link blog (which appears in the sidbar on the main blog site) onto its own RSS feed, so if you already subscribe to the RSS feed for this blog

After a Lengthy Pause… More Strategic Intuition

Well, I didn’t intend to take a 10-week break from posting here. Nonetheless, there it is… the time goes by before you know it. I have a few things to offer in my defense, though. In the intervening weeks, I’ve written and self-published a little pocketbook on Advent. I’ve begun compiling another book from material I wrote in August and September, spent several days in the Seattle area (including Vancouver BC) and began rewriting the end of the book I was compiling. I agreed to co-edit another book project with a colleague in Kelowna, and I’ve been keeping a steady pace at my pseudonymous blog. As if that weren’t enough,

Bits

Seems the webserver that this site is sitting on was doing a bit of barf-and-sputter for a few hours yesterday… and again this morning. Apologies to anyone who found me unfindable, with many packets ending up in the Bit Bucket. You might have gone looking for them as far as the last page on the Internet and found nothing,