Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior

Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior Ori Brafman has previously co-written The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations along with Rod Beckstrom. I’ve previously mentioned the book a couple of times, and was looking forward to delving into Ori’s new book, Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior, written with his brother, Rom Brafman.  I was pleased when it arrived by FedEx, and I devoured it pretty quickly.

Comparing well with Blink and The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, Sway, like Starfish, is well-written and entertaining as the Brafmans explain how people’s judgment is swayed in various contexts.  Recognizing the types of context in which one’s judgment is likely to be swayed can help avert poor decision-making.  As the old saying goes, “forewarned is forearmed.”

Markets Adapt

I have a number of partially-completed blog posts, and this is one I was reminded of while reading Ori Brafman and Rod Beckstrom’s The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations (www) over the past week… I hope to say more about the book in due course, but for now it has me thinking about the strategic flexibility of flat “leaderless” decentralized organizations vs. the relative inflexibility or unimaginatively of their monolithic counterparts. It’s an examination of piracy that had me thinking about something from Michael Raynor‘s book, The Strategy Paradox: Why Committing to Success Leads to Failure (and What to Do About It).

Zen To Done (ZTD): The Ultimate Simple Productivity System

Leo at ZenHabits has taken a stab at simplifying the GTD system with Zen To Done (ZTD): The Ultimate Simple Productivity System. He says,

ZTD captures the essential spirit of the new system: that of simplicity, of a focus on doing, in the here and now, instead of on planning and on the system.

If you’ve been having trouble with GTD, as great as it is, ZTD might be just for you. It focuses on the habit changes necessary for GTD, in a more practical way, and it focuses on doing, on simplifying, and on adding a simple structure….

ZTD attempts to address five problems that many people have with GTD. I should note that GTD isn’t really flawed, and doesn’t really need modification, but everyone is different, and ZTD is a way to customize it to better fit different personality types.