Paying for Insight

I’m enjoying Seth Godin‘s latest book, Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?. In his chapter on “Becoming the Linchpin”, he has a great diagram on page 52, which I’ve reproduced here. His linchpin discussion is a good illustration of the variance between price and value. I always cringe when a client reacts negatively to my billing rate (which is low for the industry). If they say, “I wish I could bill my time at that rate,” I know they haven’t got it and may never “get it.” I want to ask them what rate they pay their mechanic or their accountant. It’s a question of the value contributed, not the price paid. This is the problem with people who try to do too much tweaking on the product of a good designer… they don’t understand that they’re paying for expertise and then negating its value. Perhaps they’d rather have an expert at minimum wage?

The Three C's of Web Strategy

Ten years ago I was educating people about what they might expect from their websites. For many medium and small businesses, it was their first website, and they wanted to know how it was going to make them money. Nowadays, a web presence has become a part of almost every business’ “price of admission”. Ten years ago, you weren’t credible without a business card and a Yellow Pages listing, and people were already seeing that before long a website would become a part of the minimum credibility standard.

In Case You Were Wondering

I am still updating this blog, though not on a regular schedule… for this reason, I recommend following the RSS feed so you don’t miss any of the new articles. At the same time, I’ve been getting Penguinista.org back up and running, so most of my tech items will now appear over there instead. Head over there and poke around, subscribe to the feed, and watch for the Geek news over there. It’s still getting warmed up, and I am inviting contributors on that site that have an interest in Linux, Open Source Software, Internet culture. A side-effect of the move will allow this blog to remain more business/marketing focused. For the benefit of those who prefer not to have shorter items in their feed readers, I have moved my business link blog (which appears in the sidbar on the main blog site) onto its own RSS feed, so if you already subscribe to the RSS feed for this blog

The Value of Knowing Where you Are and What you Know

Some while back, Execupundit posted an example of assumptions gone wrong in the story of some prisoners planning an escape. He was outlining the importance of stating assumptions, which is crucial. In my last business, when writing a proposal in response to an RFP, we would always keep a list of assumptions that we made about the application, the environment, the business needs, whatever. It might scrawled in the margin of the RFP or on a separate sheet, but it had to be someplace. It’s a critical step…